Predictive Scheduling For Fast Food Workers In New York

On May 30, 2017, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio signed legislation to implement predictive scheduling for non-salaried fast food employees in New York City. This law requires that employers post a worker’s schedule 14 days in advance. If a schedule is changed with less than 14 days notice, an employer must pay a premium. This creates a private right of action for employees with his or her employer. The legislation will take effect in 180 days.

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Victims of Unfair Wage and Benefit Practices See Increased Effort by State of New York

Already in the first half of this year (2014), the New York Department of Labor has recovered and dispersed over 16.4 million in wages, interest, and damages, on behalf of workers who were improperly subjected to unfair wages and insufficient benefits.

According to the Department of Labor (DOL), officials have completed approximately 5000 cases in 6 months alone, representing a nearly 50% increase from the amount of cases completed within the same time frame last year.

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New York Annual Wage Notice Requirement to be Discarded

New York’s annual wage notice requirement has been discarded, however other employee protections are in the process of being strengthened

Beginning in 2015, New York employers will no longer be required to provide annual wage notices to existing employees. The annual Wage Notice duty was imposed on employers as part of the Wage Theft Prevention Act (WTPA or Act), passed in 2010 to remedy supposed abuses of the state’s wage payment laws.

In particular, the WTPA required that all NYS employers provide written notice to existing employees detailing certain wage-related information between the time frame of January 1 and February 1 of each year.

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