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EEOC Rescinds Proposed Pre-Suit Conciliation Rule

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has rescinded a proposed rule that would have made it much more difficult for the EEOC to engage in pre-suit conciliation. The changes to the conciliation process were proposed to make it easier for employers accused of employment law violations to fight the accusations. However, the rule was ultimately rescinded due to the chance that it would have made bringing charges against employers too burdensome. Continue reading “EEOC Rescinds Proposed Pre-Suit Conciliation Rule”

NY Pharma Company Pays $220K to Settle Discrimination Charges

LNK International, Inc., a pharmaceutical manufacturer located in New York, has agreed to pay $220,000 to settle charges of discrimination in its employment practices. The charges, issued by the United States Department of Justice (DOJ), indicate that the company was engaged in practices that discriminated against lawful permanent residents and other legal immigrants. The settlement shows what kind of hardship immigrants can face when seeking employment, even when they are in the United States legally. Continue reading “NY Pharma Company Pays $220K to Settle Discrimination Charges”

When Does an Internship Stop Being an Internship?

Internships are an increasingly common way for young people, especially those looking to enter skilled professions, to get early experience before entering the workforce. As internships become more common, though, more employers look to interns as a way of getting unpaid labor from inexperienced young workers. Here are just a few of the ways an internship can turn into something more than the intern might have bargained for: Continue reading “When Does an Internship Stop Being an Internship?”

New Bill Would Allow Student Athletes to Form Unions

A new bill introduced in the United States Senate would allow student athletes to form unions and collectively bargain on their own behalf. If passed, it would give student athletes the unprecedented ability to negotiate contracts with their colleges and universities, and give them labor protections they currently lack. It would also allow them to personally benefit from the enormous amount of money they bring into the educational institutions they play for. Continue reading “New Bill Would Allow Student Athletes to Form Unions”

Four Types of Concerted Activity Protected Under the NLRA

The National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) protects individuals engaged in “protected concerted activity,” allowing them to legally fight for increased pay, better benefits, and improved working conditions. This concerted activity is essential for labor organizing, and thus these protections are a cornerstone of labor law. Here are five common examples of protected concerted activity, as defined by the NLRA: Continue reading “Four Types of Concerted Activity Protected Under the NLRA”

Uber Sued For Discrimination in Background Checks

Uber Technologies, Inc., the company behind popular ride-sharing service Uber, has been sued in the Southern District of New York for allegedly violating anti-discrimination laws via its use of background checks. The class action suit alleges that Uber illegally discriminated against drivers with criminal histories and bad credit. As a result, numerous drivers were deprived of the ability to drive for Uber without warning and without a rationale given. Continue reading “Uber Sued For Discrimination in Background Checks”

What is Retaliation in Discrimination Law?

Anti-discrimination laws, like Title VII of the Civil Rights Act and the Americans With Disabilities Act, prohibit employers from discriminating against their employees due to reasons such as race, gender, color, creed, national origin, and disability status. What many people do not know, however, is that these protections also extend to people who are retaliated against for reporting discrimination. But what is retaliation in the context of discrimination law, and why is it protected against? Continue reading “What is Retaliation in Discrimination Law?”

Employers Begin to Consider Mandatory Vaccination Policies

As vaccines for the coronavirus have been developed, and are now in the process of being delivered, some employers have begun to contemplate mandatory vaccination policies. If these were implemented, it could significantly affect employees across many fields, especially essential workers who are much more likely to be exposed to the virus. But what would a mandatory vaccination policy entail, and what happens to employees who cannot, or will not, comply with them? Continue reading “Employers Begin to Consider Mandatory Vaccination Policies”

Employees Took Fewer Vacation Days in 2020

If there is one thing most people can agree on, it is that 2020 was not a pleasant year by any stretch of the imagination. For employees, however, it has been especially harsh, with many workers missing out on vacations they were legally entitled to, or being forced to use their vacation days to comply with quarantine procedures. In some cases, this has created complex situations for employers, who have had to wrestle with adjusting to problems caused by the coronavirus pandemic. Continue reading “Employees Took Fewer Vacation Days in 2020”

Five Common Types of Wage Theft

The term “wage theft” is used to describe when an employer fails to pay their workers wages they are legally owed. This shockingly common phenomenon costs workers billions of dollars every year, with employers often using leverage over employees to get away with this illegal conduct. Here are five common ways employers commit wage theft against their employees: Continue reading “Five Common Types of Wage Theft”