What is Retaliation in Discrimination Law?

Anti-discrimination laws, like Title VII of the Civil Rights Act and the Americans With Disabilities Act, prohibit employers from discriminating against their employees due to reasons such as race, gender, color, creed, national origin, and disability status. What many people do not know, however, is that these protections also extend to people who are retaliated against for reporting discrimination. But what is retaliation in the context of discrimination law, and why is it protected against? Continue reading “What is Retaliation in Discrimination Law?”

Five Common Types of Wage Theft

The term “wage theft” is used to describe when an employer fails to pay their workers wages they are legally owed. This shockingly common phenomenon costs workers billions of dollars every year, with employers often using leverage over employees to get away with this illegal conduct. Here are five common ways employers commit wage theft against their employees: Continue reading “Five Common Types of Wage Theft”

Who is Protected by Anti-Discrimination Law?

Anti-discrimination laws like Title VII of the Civil Rights Act and the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) exist to help protect against various forms of discrimination, including employment discrimination. But who, exactly, is protected by anti-discrimination laws, and how do you take advantage of these laws if you have been discriminated against? Continue reading “Who is Protected by Anti-Discrimination Law?”

Five Ways Employers Hide Workplace Discrimination

When people think of discrimination, they often think of blatant displays of sexist, racist, or otherwise bigoted behavior. However, not all forms of discrimination are so blatant, although they can have a dramatic impact on an employee’s ability to function and prosper in their workplace. Here are five common ways employers use to try to get away with workplace discrimination: Continue reading “Five Ways Employers Hide Workplace Discrimination”

What is a Protected Class?

Certain laws are meant to protect people against employment discrimination. When an employment discrimination case goes before the court, however, the court asks if the plaintiff was a member of a “protected class.” If they are not, they can have a much harder time winning their case. But what is a protected class, and why does it matter? Continue reading “What is a Protected Class?”

Five Potential Signs of Sex Discrimination

Sex discrimination is one of the most common kinds of discrimination faced by employees in the workplace, but it is also one that often takes a variety of different forms. While most people know to look for issues like non-consensual physical contact or the use of gendered slurs towards women, other sex discrimination issues can easily go unnoticed. Look for these five signs of potential sex discrimination at your workplace: Continue reading “Five Potential Signs of Sex Discrimination”

What Happens When an Employee is Misclassified?

Employee misclassification is a surprisingly widespread problem across many industries, and yet it is poorly understood by most workers. And yet, whether an employee is properly classified can have a massive impact on their taxes, income, and benefits. So, why is it that some employees are misclassified, and what can you do to deal with it? Continue reading “What Happens When an Employee is Misclassified?”

When Are Opioid Users Protected by Anti-Discrimination Law?

Addiction to opioids is a prevalent problem that affects people from every economic class and social background, and which remains a major public health problem. In addition to issues with physical and psychological health, people who are dealing with opioid addiction often face problems at work when their problems become revealed. To address these issues, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has issued guidance to employers and healthcare providers about potential implications of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) on handling employees dealing with current or past opioid addiction. Continue reading “When Are Opioid Users Protected by Anti-Discrimination Law?”

NY Federal Court Strikes Down Rule Limiting COVID Paid Leave

A New York federal court has struck down a United States Department of Labor (DOL) rule that limited who could benefit from a law that granted paid leave due to the coronavirus. The court stated the DOL overstepped its authority by issuing the limitation and said that there was no basis in law for the rule it issued. Additionally, it struck down an interpretation of the law that expanded an exception for “health care providers,” and partially vacated other interpretations of the law which limited people’s ability to take time off. Continue reading “NY Federal Court Strikes Down Rule Limiting COVID Paid Leave”

Employers Can Discipline Newly Unionized Employees According to NLRB

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has issued a ruling making it permissible for an employer to discipline newly unionized employees for violations of the company’s disciplinary policy. The ruling overturns a 2016 decision which made it illegal for an employer to discipline a newly unionized employee due to concerns of potential abuse. However, the Board has ruled that employers have no legal obligation to consider whether an employee has been recently unionized before disciplining them. Continue reading “Employers Can Discipline Newly Unionized Employees According to NLRB”