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Does Your Work Contract Contain a Noncompete Clause?

Unbeknownst to many workers, when they enter into an agreement with their new employer and sign the paperwork, they may have agreed to a noncompete clause. What this tells the employee is that, if the employee decides to leave, they cannot immediately work for a competitor. These non-competes may also contain restrictions as to where you may work and how long before you can work for a competing company.
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De Blasio Introduces New Worker Protections and Benefits

On January 10, 2019, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that he will introduce a package that includes improved benefits for private-sector workers and protections to ensure they are paid as promised.
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Psychological Workplace Bullying and its Effects

Having a boss or supervisor who constantly yells or curses at you is engaging in psychological workplace bullying. The employee who is on the receiving end of this abuse usually does not feel the physical pain as if he or she were assaulted by their boss. But the pain is still real, nonetheless.

Psychological harassment occurs just as frequently as sexual harassment, but it is not as frequently reported. That is because, when the employee is being abused by the superior, he or she believes that their superior is right and they are the problem. As a result, the worker does not believe they are the victim in this situation.
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Workplace Closures and Severance Pay

Vox reported that employees of the department store Sears were let go after the retailer announced it was shutting down its stores. Many store associates were told they would receive an eight-week severance package, but, according to the article, after two weeks, the checks stopped coming after Sears announced it was filing for bankruptcy. Meanwhile, Sears executives were allowed to collect $25 million in bonuses after the filing, according to the Chicago Business Journal.
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Sexual Harassment in The New York City Hospitality Industry

New York City is an icon for the rich and famous.  It is also known for its extravagant restaurants and exclusive nightlife. However, for many young women and men working in the NYC hospitality industry, incidents of sexual harassment are very common.  According to a recent report, 8 in 10 hospitality workers have experienced being sexually harassed.

There are many federal laws, as well as many state statutes and city ordinances that govern sexual harassment in the workplace.  According to the law, any unwelcome sexual advances, comments or actions constitute sexual harassment. Advances may be by a co-worker, supervisor, or anyone else in a place of authority. When a person brings an issue of sexual harassment to the attention of a superior or boss, the employer is responsible for addressing the problem and taking action. If not, an employer will be liable regardless of being directly involved in the sexual harassment.
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Study Shows Gender Pay Gap Widens When Taking Bonus Pay into Account

ADP Research Institute® announced it recently released the Rethinking Gender Pay Inequity in a More Transparent World study, which found that the pay gap that currently exists between men and women increases when bonus pay is added into the mix.

The study, which followed 11,000 exempt new hires – both male and female – who worked for the same company from the quarter of 2010 to December 2016, found that, on average, men earn $15,000 more in base salary than women do, which is a 17% discrepancy. When bonus pay is included, bonuses for men are 69% greater, widening the overall pay gap to 19%.
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Inflammatory Bowel Disease May Result In Reasonable Accommodations

According to the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA), there will be an estimated 1.6 million new cases of inflammatory bowel disease diagnosed in the United States this year. Inflammatory bowel disease is an umbrella term that refers to intestinal disorders that cause prolonged inflammation that result in anemia, ulcers, diarrhea, bowel obstructions, colon cancer, fistulas, and malnutrition.

The American with Disabilities Act (ADA), prohibits discrimination against individuals with a qualified disability. The ADA applies to employers with 15 or more employees.  Federal employees are afforded protections under the Equal Employment Opportunities Commission (EEOC). In addition, the New York Human Rights Law (NYHRL) provides, “It shall be an unlawful discriminatory practice for an employer to refuse to provide reasonable accommodations to the known disabilities of an employee.” (Executive Law 296(3).)
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LGBTQ Workplace Discrimination

Throughout the past few decades, North American society has become diverse. While many employers are able to see the benefits in honing a diversified team, these wide-spread movements towards equality in the workplace are raising concerns about maintaining the status-quo when welcoming LGBTQ employees into their ranks.

If you or someone you know has fallen victim to workplace discrimination based on sexual orientation or sexual identity, it is important to consult a skilled employment law attorney who can fight to enforce the rights you are entitled to. The Employee’s Lawyer™, Steven Mitchell Sack, has successfully handled thousands of employment law cases for more than 38 years and will help guide you through all aspects of employment law. To schedule a consultation, call our office at (917) 371-8000 or fill out his contact form.

Paid Bereavement Leave

Bereavement leave refers to when an employee takes time off of work to grieve and mourn the loss of a spouse, child, or close family member. There are only two states which offer some form of bereavement leave to its workers, which are Oregon and Illinois. However, New York may become the third state to offer a form of bereavement leave.
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The Job Interview: Questions that are Necessary and Questions that are Off-limits

Interviewing for a job can be nerve-wracking. While the complexities of the interview process can deter your attention away from essential legal concepts, it is important to be attentive to what the interviewer is asking, especially in a legal sense. Potential employers should understand what they can and cannot ask of an applicant, but some may fail to recognize the severity of asking a discriminatory question. Questions along the following lines should always be avoided:
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